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Listed Buildings of Banff

Listed Buildings of Banff

Listing is the recognition through the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) (Scotland) Act 1997 that a building or structure is of ‘special’ interest. Buildings are listed under Categories A, B and C(S)

A - Buildings of national or international importance, either architectural or historic; or fine little-altered examples of some particular period, style or building type.
B - Buildings of regional or more than local importance, or major examples of some particular period, style or building type which may have been altered.
C(S) - Buildings of local importance, lesser examples of any period, style, or building type, as originally constructed or moderately altered; and simple, traditional buildings which group well with others in category A and B or are part of a planned group such as an estate or an industrial complex. Note, buildings can qualify either for architectural or historic interest. Sometimes it is enough to have close historical associations. Listing covers a wide definition of buildings including walls, fountains, sundials, statues, bridges, bandstands and piers. It can also be contribution to a group – planned burgh, town square, or model village. Vernacular is very often groupings.. so are the buildings round a mansion. Listing covers both the interior and exterior.

Banff listings were mostly done in 1972 – the committee know the son of the Edinburgh architectural historian who did them. Some were added in 1995 – all of Campbell Street,for example which is C(S) and they are still adding – in 2004 they listed the central operations block and the control tower at Boyndie Airfield.

Any building put up before 1840 might be expected to be listed if its special character is substantially unimpaired. Later buildings are selected for their individual character and quality (normally not less than 30 years old). Changes which may seem minor such as stone cleaning, painting all or part of the property or replacing timber windows could have a major impact on the building’s character and therefore normally require listed building consent.

The planning authority can serve a Repairs Notice (compulsory purchase) if an owner deliberately neglects the building to justify its demolition and redevelopment of the site. The planning authority can buy the building at a price which excludes the value of the land for redevelopment.At 7 days notice the planning authority can undertake urgent works .. cost can be reclaimed from the owner.

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A-Listed Buildings of Banff

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How to Protect a Historic Building

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The Scheduled Monuments

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Listed Buildings of Banff and Surrounding Area